Friday, 25 May, 2007

Legacy

Sunil Gavaskar and Sachin Tendulkar both started as quintessential middle class Maharashtrians. Gavaskar played his early cricket in Chikalwadi and Tendulkar grew up playing at Sahitya Sahawas, the abode of Marathi Saraswats (intelligentsia).

Their cricketing exploits are well documented. But beyond the cricketing field, they have pioneered and abetted in their own way, a process of frenzied commercialization of the game. A legacy which subjects these players to alternate deification and vilification.

When Gavaskar started his career, team India had achieved little noteworthy in the preceding 40 years of international cricket. His advent coincided with two of India’s most famous overseas wins in West Indies and England. Gavaskar, in fact, played a huge part in the former. He was catapulted to stardom overnight. Not that there weren’t many stars before him, but Gavaskar challenged and demolished the stereotypical image of an Indian cricket star. He used his fame to commercially venture into areas that were never tapped by an Indian cricketer before. For some Indians entrenched in a socialist mindset, it was akin to desecration of the sacred game of cricket. After all, was cricket not played for the love of it?

Mihir Bose in his book ‘A Maidan View – The Magic of Indian Cricket’, devotes an entire chapter titled ‘The Besieged Hero’ to Gavaskar. He writes:

Indians respect Gavaskar but they also fear him. He is not for instance, able to invoke the sort of warmth that was accorded to Kapil Dev or his own brother in law, Vishwanath.

Bose quotes MAK Pataudi from the article ‘The decline of Indian cricket’. Writes MAK,

Gavaskar opened up entire new vistas of making money. He had noticed how quickly cricketers once out of the limelight were actually shunned by the same people who had fussed over them, fought for the pleasure of inviting them home and queued to have photographs taken with them. In Bombay only money seemed to matter, and there was more than one way to make it. Gavaskar found them all. Advertising, film producing, writing articles (on the same match, but for different publications), taking fee for organizing matches, writing instant books which were spiced to sell better, appearance money and signing contracts with manufacturers of sports equipment. He became the first millionaire through cricket, rich enough to buy a flat in the centre of Bombay. In a capitalist cricketing country, he would have been considered a genius. In India they began to call him a mercenary, and within the team he became the envy of some of who felt that their contribution to Indian cricket was not much appreciated. Why should Gavaskar hog all the publicity as well as the money? The answer was simple: he had reached those dizzy heights to which no Indian cricketer in his right mind would even dream of aspiring. As importantly, he was articulate where others were dumb, he was controversial where other dared not to be, he could even be witty and this made him ideal material for the media and advertiser.

What Gavaskar started, Tendulkar took to another level. Sachin was fortunate that within two years of making his international debut, India had shed its socialist mindset to become a free economy. Economy, that celebrated entrepreneurial spirit. Sachin was shrewd enough to capitalize on it. He wowed the Indian public, first with his Rs 200 million deal with World Tel in 1995 and then followed up with a mind boggling Rs one billion deal in the year 2000. It helped him no less that in the intervening period, Mark Mascaranhas had made BCCI aware of the gold mine they were sitting on, by successfully bagging the TV rights of 1996 world cup. Ofcourse, Sachin was also riding the crest of his batting form.

And so long as Sachin performed, his money matters remained a part of largely private domain. Tongues started wagging when there was a perceptible decline in his batting post 2002. Initial murmurs gave way to noisy talk. Fans who were previously dazzled by his multi-crore contracts, raised questions on Tendulkar’s attitude, something unthinkable five years ago.

Whereas other Indian sport icons like Sania Mirza, Leander Paes could afford to be erratic - they played an individual sport and largely controlled their own destiny – Sachin could not, for he not only played a team game but was also responsible for India’s fluctuating fortunes.

It seems remarkable therefore that, despite his recent failures, Sachin has managed to bag Rs two billion contract from Iconix, earlier this year. Harsha Bhogle dismisses questions on Tendulkar’s worth as typical ‘middle class’ ish. According to him Sachin still earns only a fraction of what the top international sportsmen and sportswomen do!

Two great cricketers, one huge legacy. Whether it bodes well or otherwise for Indian cricket, only time will tell. You can take your pick too.

9 comments:

Golandaaz said...

I recently read Lala Amarnath's biography. The lifestyle cricket afforded to Lala in a British India is unparalled. A good post but incomplete without comparing Lala.

I understand that you restricted yourslef to Marathi players. But think about comparing this against the popularity of Amarnath

Cricket Guru said...

You were spot on with Lala Amarnath.

In terms of popularity he was at par with Sunny or SRT. And his popularity across the border perhaps exceeded even that of the film stars of his time.

I am yet to read read his biography (I presume you are referring to one written by his son, Rajender) but remember reading about his first century at the Bombay Gymkhana against Douglas Jardine's England team. It was said that some women tore off their jewelry as presents, a millionaire gave him 800 pounds and another presented him with a car, all that in 1933!

Anonymous said...

In case you desire to play Madden, NCAA Football, FIFA, NHL2K or Fight Night gamez on your Ps3 or Xbox 360 online for cash - we are looking for game testers now. Join us on Facebook before March 31 and you can receive $2,000 in cash: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=wall&ref=mf&gid=298821430083&_fb_noscript=1

Anonymous said...

Howdy all! I own a small tattoo business in Toronto. Previously I bought all tattoo supplies at really low prices but my supplier killed himself (life is weird!) so I'm trying to find a low cost tattoo supply seller (preferable online) to buy tattoo equipment from. Here is an example of what I am interested in: Tattoo Equipment. Thanks a million in advance for any information dudes! PM me or write me at: triple6tattoo@hotmail.com

Jack said...

Thanks for sharing Online Tattoo Supplies Shop

ninest123 said...

ugg boots, chanel handbags, polo ralph lauren outlet, ray ban sunglasses, oakley sunglasses, air max, tiffany and co, nike air max, louis vuitton outlet, gucci outlet, louis vuitton outlet, sac longchamp, nike free, nike free, longchamp, prada handbags, nike outlet, oakley sunglasses, louis vuitton, tory burch outlet, ralph lauren pas cher, ray ban sunglasses, tiffany jewelry, kate spade outlet, oakley sunglasses, uggs on sale, louis vuitton, longchamp outlet, replica watches, louboutin outlet, christian louboutin outlet, nike air max, louis vuitton, longchamp pas cher, louboutin shoes, ugg boots, longchamp outlet, ray ban sunglasses, louboutin pas cher, cheap oakley sunglasses, nike roshe run, louboutin, jordan shoes, burberry, prada outlet, air jordan pas cher, oakley sunglasses, replica watches, michael kors, polo ralph lauren outlet

ninest123 said...

michael kors outlet, replica handbags, timberland, michael kors outlet, oakley pas cher, ray ban pas cher, michael kors, michael kors, nike blazer, true religion outlet, true religion jeans, hogan, hermes, ugg boots, lacoste pas cher, lululemon, ugg boots, converse pas cher, nike air max, new balance pas cher, mulberry, michael kors, nike air max, nike free run uk, true religion jeans, tn pas cher, burberry, hollister, vans pas cher, michael kors outlet, coach outlet, ray ban uk, kate spade handbags, coach outlet, true religion jeans, nike roshe, abercrombie and fitch, north face, ralph lauren uk, michael kors outlet, sac guess, hollister pas cher, burberry outlet online, vanessa bruno, michael kors, nike air max, michael kors outlet, north face, air force, coach purses

ninest123 said...

converse, mcm handbags, nike huarache, new balance, nike roshe, ghd, hollister, instyler, nfl jerseys, hollister, ferragamo shoes, vans shoes, babyliss, abercrombie and fitch, asics running shoes, birkin bag, bottega veneta, vans, north face outlet, nike trainers, north face outlet, insanity workout, converse outlet, p90x workout, longchamp, soccer jerseys, oakley, jimmy choo shoes, mont blanc, wedding dresses, iphone cases, herve leger, gucci, lancel, lululemon, timberland boots, mac cosmetics, reebok shoes, hollister, celine handbags, soccer shoes, valentino shoes, baseball bats, ralph lauren, nike air max, nike air max, louboutin, ray ban, chi flat iron, beats by dre

ninest123 said...

moncler, replica watches, ugg pas cher, swarovski, juicy couture outlet, wedding dresses, sac louis vuitton pas cher, ugg,ugg australia,ugg italia, louis vuitton, canada goose, louis vuitton, pandora charms, supra shoes, canada goose outlet, montre pas cher, karen millen, canada goose, marc jacobs, links of london, moncler, toms shoes, pandora jewelry, canada goose, doudoune canada goose, moncler, moncler, hollister, juicy couture outlet, bottes ugg, ugg boots uk, moncler outlet, louis vuitton, louis vuitton, thomas sabo, ugg,uggs,uggs canada, moncler, canada goose uk, canada goose outlet, coach outlet, pandora jewelry, moncler, canada goose, moncler, pandora charms, swarovski crystal